Nanoscale pairings of particles that show promise as miniaturized power sources.

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In a step toward engineering ever-smaller electronic devices, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have assembled nanoscale pairings of particles that show promise as miniaturized power sources. Composed of light-absorbing, colloidal quantum dots linked to carbon-based fullerene nanoparticles, these tiny two-particle systems can convert light to electricity in a precisely controlled way.

“This is the first demonstration of a hybrid inorganic/organic, dimeric (two-particle) material that acts as an electron donor-bridge-acceptor system for converting light to electrical current,” said Brookhaven physical chemist Mircea Cotlet, lead author of a paper describing the dimers and their assembly method in Angewandte Chemie.

By varying the length of the linker molecules and the size of the quantum dots, the scientists can control the rate and the magnitude of fluctuations in light-induced electron transfer at the level of the individual dimer. “This control makes these dimers promising power-generating units for molecular electronics or more efficient photovoltaic solar cells,” said Cotlet, who conducted this research with materials scientist Zhihua Xu at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN).

For more on this article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110510111203.htm

Source: Science Daily / University of Toronto

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