The innovative solar technology "would change the equation for energy," according to UC researchers.

A pair of University of Cincinnati researchers has seen the light – a bright, powerful light – and it just might change the future of how building interiors are brightened.

Advertisement

In fact, that light comes directly from the sun. And with the help of tiny, electrofluidic cells and a series of open-air “ducts,” sunlight can naturally illuminate windowless work spaces deep inside office buildings and excess energy can be harnessed, stored and directed to other applications.

This new technology is called SmartLight, and it’s the result of an interdisciplinary research collaboration between UC’s Anton Harfmann and Jason Heikenfeld. Their research paper “Smart Light – Enhancing Fenestration to Improve Solar Distribution in Buildings” was recently presented at Italy’s CasaClimainternational energy forum.

“The SmartLight technology would be groundbreaking. It would be game changing,” says Harfmann, an associate professor in UC’s School of Architecture and Interior Design. “This would change the equation for energy. It would change the way buildings are designed and renovated. It would change the way we would use energy and deal with the reality of the sun. It has all sorts of benefits and implications that I don’t think we’ve even begun to touch.”

MAJOR IMPROVEMENT THROUGH MINIMAL ADJUSTMENTS

There’s a simple question SmartLight addresses: Is there a smarter way to use sunlight? Every day the sun’s rays hit Earth with more than enough energy to meet many of society’s energy demands, but existing technologies designed to harness that energy, such as photovoltaic cells, aren’t very efficient. A typical photovoltaic array loses most of the sun’s energy when it gets converted into electricity. But with SmartLight, Harfmann says the sunlight channeled through the system stays, and is used, in its original form. This method is far more efficient than converting light into electricity then back into light and would be far more sustainable than generating electric light by burning fossil fuels or releasing nuclear energy.

The technology could be applied to any building – big or small, old or new, residential or commercial. But Harfmann and Heikenfeld believe it will have the greatest impact on large commercial buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration shows that 21 percent of commercial sector electricity consumption went toward lighting in 2011. Harfmann calls the energy demand for lighting in big, commercial buildings “the major energy hog,” and he says energy needed to occupy buildings accounts for close to 50 percent of the total energy consumed by humans….

A room with SmartLight off (above) and on (below)

This rendering depicts how an office might appear with SmartLight off (above) and on (below). Sunlight is directed to different spaces, including to a “SmartTrackLight” in the outer hallway.

For more on this aritlce: University of Cincinnati http://www.uc.edu/news/NR.aspx?id=18752

Announcement from our Chairman, David C BarclayThe World Renewable Energy Association are delighted to announce the launch of a brand-new initiative exclusively for its members. The Renewable Energy Finance Hub has been launched following the largest survey undertaken with UK businesses conducted by WoREA in conjunction with the UK Government and its partners. Reduce your businesses carbon footprint today and begin your journey towards net zero!